13 Children’s Books That Will Make Millennials Nostalgic

Dec 07, 2015 | by Valentina Vojkovic

Despite the fact that we have graduated from vibrant animations and clever rhymes to sophisticated literature… or in some cases… 50 Shades of Grey, we can’t deny our forever faithfulness to our favorite childhood stories.

The stories that evoke fond memories of your mom’s warm chocolate chip cookies, getting snugly tucked in with your beloved teddy bear or huddling in a tent in your backyard while dad reads you the classics by lantern light. Nothing was more comforting than listening to a story before bed, enjoying its brilliant colors and doe-eyed characters, your eyes growing heavier with the passing of each paper page.

In the spirit of spreading sleepy serenity to all of our readers, we have compiled a list of enchanting bedtime stories that will incite nostalgia and take you back to a simpler time. Reading them with an adult perspective might even uncover some hidden meanings.

Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Perhaps one of the more obvious choices, it’s hard to find someone who didn’t love this classic. We challenge you to find the tiny mouse in every picture of the room.

Image Source: Harper & Brothers
Image Source: Harper & Brothers

Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Let the wild rumpus begin! Did you know? The “things” were based on Sendak’s immigrant relatives.

Image Source: Harper & Row
Image Source: Harper & Row

The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle & Bill Martin Jr.

A young East German librarian once told Carle that she opposed the book because the caterpillar represents a capitalist.

Image Source: World Publishing Company
Image Source: World Publishing Company

The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Seuss

This 236-word book took the author nine months to write!

Image Source: Random House
Image Source: Random House

The Story of Babar by Jean de Brunhoff

The author’s wife originally told the tale about an orphaned elephant to her sick sons who repeated it to their illustrator father Jean the next day who immediately recognized its potential as a children’s book.

Image Source: Random House
Image Source: Random House


The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

Silverstein was a songwriter and wrote a song version of The Giving Tree that was included on Bobby Bare’s 1974 country album, Singin’ In the Kitchen.

Image Source: Harper & Row
Image Source: Harper & Row

Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans

In the 1990s, you could buy a Madeline doll that came complete with her infamous appendectomy scar.

Image Source: Penguin Young Readers Group
Image Source: Penguin Young Readers Group

A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond

Originally, Paddington was going to be from “Darkest Africa” (instead of Peru) until Bond’s agent informed him that no bears exist in Africa.

Image Source: Harriman House Publishing
Image Source: Harriman House Publishing

The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

Peter Rabbit is the oldest licensed character in the world, patented by Potter in 1903.

Image Source: Frederick Warne & Co. 
Image Source: Frederick Warne & Co. 

Winnie The Pooh by A.A. Milne

Milne’s son Christoper Robin, resented his father and Winnie the Pooh claiming that his name was stolen and he was left with nothing but empty fame. 

Image Source: Methuen Publishing
Image Source: Methuen Publishing

The Caboose Who Got Loose by Bill Peet

Before writing some of the most memorable children’s books of all time, Peet worked on several Disney productions, including Snow White & The Seven Dwarves.

Image Source: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Image Source: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Harold And The Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson

Crockett Johnson and his wife, Ruth Krauss, expressed leftist views during the paranoia of the Cold War. Risky collaborations and subtle liberal themes in their work left the two under FBI surveillance for many years.

Image Source: Harper & Brothers
Image Source: Harper & Brothers

Corduroy by Don Freeman

The beloved children’s book was rejected by and received negative feedback from multiple publishers before finally being published.

Image Source: Viking Press
Image Source: Viking Press

Honorable Mention: Doctor De Soto by William Steig

Recognize this gem? Written by “The King of Cartoons”, the popular children’s book was soon followed by—wait for it—Shrek!. Yes, our favorite Dreamworks film was once, like many others, a children’s book.

Image Source: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Image Source: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Are we missing your favorite? Share it with us on Twitter and be sure to tag #TheNook.

Sources: Mental Floss, BBC